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Server Reboot
by Natassia Stelmaszek - Thursday, October 27, 2016, 10:16 AM
 

The Moodle server will be restarted Monday October 31, 2016 some time between 7 AM and 8 AM.    There should only be a brief interruption of service.

Thank You,

Moodle Administrator


Available courses

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

Streaming video for French 301-303

German 101 Beginning German, first quarter

German 101 Beginning German, first quarter

First year German, third quarter.
First year German, third quarter.
First year German, third quarter.

German 111 Hybrid. This course reviews the content introduced in 101 and 102 and requires background knowledge for both levels.

Intensive first-year German including 101, 102 and 103

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Current foreign language teaching methods and approaches. Learning and teaching strategies and techniques for the four skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) including cultural notions.


You must hold a TAship to enroll in this course.
Includes useful documents and information (e.g., syllabus design, grading policies, etc.) for teaching assistants and graduate students in the Department of Scandinavian Studies.

German 111 Hybrid. This course reviews the content introduced in 101 and 102 and requires background knowledge for both levels.

Includes useful documents and information (e.g., syllabus design, grading policies, etc.) for teaching assistants and graduate students in the Department of Scandinavian Studies.

This course will introduce you to the field of linguistics: the scientific study and analysis of human language. We will survey some of the core subfields of linguistics: phonetics (the study of the perception/ production of speech sounds), phonology (the study of sound systems and patterns), morphology (the study of word formation and structure), syntax (the study of sentence structure), and semantics (the study of word and sentence meaning). In this survey, you will be introduced the tools that linguists use to analyze the structure of language. Our investigation into this field will include linguistic data that represents the vast diversity of human language as well as some of its universal characteristics. In addition, we will also investigate how the study of language and linguistic structure can be used in other disciplines, such as psychology, neurology, and sociology.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

Introduction to the articulatory and acoustic correlates of phonological features. Issues covered include the mapping of dynamic events to static representations, phonetic evidence for phonological description, universal constraints on phonological structure. Prerequisite: LING 200 or equivalent introductory course in linguistics.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

This Moodle course is for Linguistics 100: Fundamentals of Grammar, Summer 2016.


Introduction to the articulatory and acoustic correlates of phonological features. Issues covered include the mapping of dynamic events to static representations, phonetic evidence for phonological description, universal constraints on phonological structure. Prerequisite: LING 200 or equivalent introductory course in linguistics.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

This course will introduce you to the field of linguistics: the scientific study and analysis of human language. We will survey some of the core subfields of linguistics: phonetics (the study of the perception/ production of speech sounds), phonology (the study of sound systems and patterns), morphology (the study of word formation and structure), syntax (the study of sentence structure), and semantics (the study of word and sentence meaning). In this survey, you will be introduced the tools that linguists use to analyze the structure of language. Our investigation into this field will include linguistic data that represents the vast diversity of human language as well as some of its universal characteristics. In addition, we will also investigate how the study of language and linguistic structure can be used in other disciplines, such as psychology, neurology, and sociology.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

Introduction to the articulatory and acoustic correlates of phonological features. Issues covered include the mapping of dynamic events to static representations, phonetic evidence for phonological description, universal constraints on phonological structure, and implications of psychological speech-sound categorization for phonological theory. Prerequisite: either LING 200 or LING 400.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

This course examines language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species, the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, the dimensions of language use, the relationship between language and writing, and the impact of historical linguistics on contemporary theory. Not open for credit to students who have completed LING 400.

Lushootseed 202.  

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Write a concise and interesting paragraph here that explains what this course is about
Includes useful documents and information (e.g., syllabus design, grading policies, etc.) for teaching assistants and graduate students in the Department of Scandinavian Studies.
This site is meant to contain the materials for the Discovery Seminar, and intensive course in Russian.
German 111 Hybrid Autumn 2009.

Web site for Intermediate Russian at the University of Washington.

The Weber State University LEAP (Learning English for Academic Purposes) Department provides intensive English language courses for students in the process of acquiring English as a second language for academic use. It is the mission of the Department to prepare these students to function effectively in mainstream academic classes where English is the language of instruction. In doing so, we also seek to familiarize students with American culture and the academic atmosphere of studying in an American university.

IRichard's IBEP Business Communication [D], Summer 2014